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NAMHO CONFERENCE 2022

NORTH YORKSHIRE / CLEVELAND
hosted by Cleveland Mining Heritage Society

"Industrial Minerals"

NAMHO CONFERENCE 2022 - Industrial Minerals

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SURFACE PROGRAMME - 2022

  • Grosmont North York Moors Railway Depot (NYMR)
  • Grinkle Ironstone Mine (Dave Richardson and John Butler)
  • Staithes Ironstone (Steve Livera and Simon Chapman)
  • Fair Head Sandstone Quarry (Nick Ward)
  • Grosmont to Goathland Industrial History (Jane Ellis)
  • Esk Valley Ironstone and Whinstone (Dolerite) Mines (Phil Naylor)
  • Grosmont Geology and Industrial Archaeology (Tammy Naylor and/or Steve Livera)
  • Rosedale East Ironstone Mine (Patrick Chambers)
  • Margrove: Valley of Industry (Includes Alum, Brick making and Ironstone) (Peter Appleton)
  • Cleveland Ironstone Mining Museum
  • Skelton Park and Shaft Ironstone Mines (Simon Chapman)
  • Sandsend and Deepgrove Alum and Jet (Simon Chapman and Steve Livera)
  • Grosmont North York Moors Railway Depot (NYMR)

    The NYMR 'Shed Tours' offer a behind the scenes look at the working of the steam and diesel locomotive servicing and repair works that enable the continuing operation of the preserved fleet. We will look into the workshops and running shed, normally out of bounds to the public, and possibly a look on the footplate of an engine, to describe the effort and technology involved in keeping these machines running. This will include the preparation for a day's work, some unique equipment and old skills being learnt by a younger generation to keep the wheels turning. If you've seen the Channel 5 series on the NYMR and wondered, come and see what REALLY goes on!

    Good footwear will be required for the visit as this is an active workshop with tripping hazards and parts of the floor are covered in oil and other fluids.

    Grosmont North York Moors Railway Depot (NYMR)  Grosmont North York Moors Railway Depot (NYMR)  

     

    Grinkle Ironstone Mine (Dave Richardson and John Butler)

    Grinkle Ironstone Mine opened in 1875 and initially connected by narrow gauge railway to Port Mulgrave from where the ironstone was sent by sea to Jarrow Ironworks on the River Tyne. From 1916 until closure in 1930 output was handled via an incline to the standard gauge network. Tipping by Boulby Potash Mine has covered most of the site but the remainder has been excavated by CMHS.

    Sadly this site has recently received unwanted attention from YouTubers so underground access may be impossible by the time of the conference. In light of this we are listed this as a surface trip, but some limited access may be possible (so bring a helmet and light!)

    Grinkle Ironstone Mine (Dave Richardson and John Butler)  Grinkle Ironstone Mine (Dave Richardson and John Butler)  

     

    Staithes Ironstone (Steve Livera and Simon Chapman)

    The village of Staithes is well-known as a quaint fishing village on the North Yorkshire coast but it was an early site of ironstone mining starting in the 1850s and much remains in the cliffs and on the foreshore of this activity. The area is the best one available for looking at the Cleveland Ironstone Formation and its ironstone seams.

    From Staithes the walk will be along the foreshore towards Port Mulgrave around low tide and although the walking is generally level there will be a need to be aware of slippery surfaces and shallow pools. The cliffs are unstable and rock falls of all magnitude mean that attendees will need to bring hard hats for the trip, as only a few spares will be available from the leaders. Bring a packed lunch and a drink.

    NOTE : Parking at Staithes Bank Top is Pay and Display

    Staithes Ironstone (Steve Livera and Simon Chapman)  

     

    Fair Head Sandstone Quarry (Nick Ward)

    Fair Head, just above Grosmont is one of just a couple of working quarries that remain of what once was a much larger industry across the NYM. The quarry works the beautiful yellow Saltwick Formation sandstone that provided the building stone for the industrial development of Grosmont, be it railway, ironstone or Whinstone investment. The owner provides dressed stone across the North of England.

    Attendees will need to bring good boots and a hard hat, hi-viz is not a requirement but if you have it, bring it.

    NOTE : This site is private property and can only be visited as part of organised programme.

    Fair Head Sandstone Quarry (Nick Ward)  

     

    Grosmont to Goathland Industrial History (Jane Ellis)

    Meet outside the Station Tavern, Grosmont (next to the railway level crossing) at 10.30am for an 8-mile circular walk (taking approx. 6 hours) to explore the sites of ironworking and the quarrying, mining and processing of whinstone, with their associated tramways and reservoirs. The walk takes in the route of George Stephenson's 1836 horse-drawn Whitby & Pickering Railway and climbs the 1500yd 1 in 15 rope-worked incline to Goathland. There are good views of the steam trains running through the Murk Esk valley.

    The trip includes half a mile of walking through short moorland heather, a quarter mile of rock-strewn quarry floor and some undulating grassland. Bring a packed lunch and a drink.

    Grosmont to Goathland Industrial History (Jane Ellis)  

     

    Esk Valley Ironstone and Whinstone (Dolerite) Mines (Phil Naylor)

    The lease for this mine was signed in 1859 and the site attracted large investment with the sinking of a 70 m shaft to exploit the Avicula and Pecten Seams. After a troubled history due to varying ironstone prices the mine eventually ceased production in 1875. However, the surface site foundations are very well preserved and have been extensively cleared by volunteers through the 'Land of Iron' project, including shaft equipment. The area includes a number of related buildings and the remains of a Whinstone quarry and mine that utilised the adjacent railway for export.

    This is an easy walking trip but good footwear will be required.

    NOTE : Please use NAMHO campsite parking field, not residents car park.

    Esk Valley Ironstone and Whinstone (Dolerite) Mines (Phil Naylor)  Esk Valley Ironstone and Whinstone (Dolerite) Mines (Phil Naylor)  

    © Photo by Tom Mutton, copyright Land of Iron

     

    Grosmont Geology and Industrial Archaeology (Tammy Naylor and/or Steve Livera)

    The Grosmont Ironstone industry was the earliest ironstone mining in North Yorkshire, developing in synergy with the coming of the Whitby to Pickering railway in 1836. The village was a major industrial site with 3 blast furnaces as well as numerous mines. The furnaces ceased production in 1891 but mining continued on a stop-start basis until 1916. One of the two ironstone seams mined in the area is very well exposed, as are numerous remains of the developing railways and mining activity.

    This is a walking trip on easy going ground but good footwear is required.

    Grosmont Geology and Industrial Archaeology (Tammy Naylor and/or Steve Livera)  

     

    Rosedale East Ironstone Mine (Patrick Chambers)

    Investigations began in 1859 and continued on a stop-start basis until the general strike of 1926 which forced closure. It was connected by railway to Teesside in 1861 (over the moors via Ingleby Incline) and is an extensive mine site. Underground access is not available but adit entrances, drainage levels and building remains are extensive. These include the famous Iron and Stone Kiln sets, parts of which have been stabilised through the 'Land of Iron' project.

    This is an easy walking trip with extensive views of the Rosedale West ironstone remains across the valley but good footwear is required.

    Rosedale East Ironstone Mine (Patrick Chambers)  Rosedale East Ironstone Mine (Patrick Chambers)  

    © Photo by Tom Mutton, copyright Land of Iron

     

    Margrove: Valley of Industry (Includes Alum, Brick making and Ironstone) (Peter Appleton)

    The industrial heritage to be visited includes a small, disused brick and tile works, and the site of north-east Yorkshire's earliest alum works. Also visible from the route is the site of a social initiative created to help the ironstone miners through the Depression years of the 1930s and which became known as 'Heartbreak Hill'. The leader is a well-respected local historian and published author.

    The first and last 0.5km of this 6km walk are on a roadside footpath, all the rest is on level or gently undulating farm tracks, field paths, and an old railway track bed. Good footwear is required.

    Margrove: Valley of Industry (Includes Alum, Brick making and Ironstone) (Peter Appleton)  Margrove: Valley of Industry (Includes Alum, Brick making and Ironstone) (Peter Appleton)  

     

    Cleveland Ironstone Mining Museum

    The museum is currently in the middle of a £2.3M rebuild and it is NOT possible to make an ad-hoc visit at this time.#p The only way to visit the museum this year is as part of our surface programme and we cannot guarantee exactly what will be on that tour, it will be entirely dependent on the progress of the new build.

    Hopefully entry into the short North Drift 'tourist mine' should be possible on the day, despite this being listed as a surface tour.  Link to their site.

    Cleveland Ironstone Mining Museum  

     

    Skelton Park and Shaft Ironstone Mines (Simon Chapman)

    Park Pit is of national importance as one of the most complete remaining shaft mines illustrating structures now lost from most colliery and iron mining sites. The Listed buildings are derelict since the mine closed in 1938 and entry into them is not allowed but can be readily seen from outside. From here a level track leads for a mile through woodland to Old Shaft Mine where the excavated remains of an ironstone mine site will be explained.

    This is an easy walking trip but there are tripping hazards and good boots will be required.

    NOTE : This site is on private property and can only be visited as part of the organised programme.

    Skelton Park and Shaft Ironstone Mines (Simon Chapman)  

    Skelton Park and Shaft Ironstone Mines (Simon Chapman)  

     

    Sandsend and Deepgrove Alum and Jet (Simon Chapman and Steve Livera)

    Extraction and processing of shale to produce alum crystals took place extensively along the cliffs west of Sandsend village from the seventeenth to the nineteenth century. Although these workings are easily accessible from a level former railway track along the cliff top it has to be reached by climbing up a flight of steps. Jet extraction and cement production also took place here in this very scenic location.

    The cliffs are unstable and rock falls of all magnitude mean that attendees will need to bring hard hats for the trip, as only a few spares will be available from the leaders. Bring a packed lunch and a drink.

    NOTE : Parking at Sandsend is Pay and Display

    Sandsend and Deepgrove Alum and Jet (Simon Chapman and Steve Livera)  

    Sandsend and Deepgrove Alum and Jet (Simon Chapman and Steve Livera)